BIOL 2114 Syllabus

Subject Code

BIOL

Course Number

2114

Course Title

Anatomy and Physiology II

Prerequisites

BIOL 2113 with a grade of C or higher, BIOL 2113L with a grade of C or higher

Corequisites

BIOL 2114L

Terms Offered

Offered every semester

Credit Hours

(3-0-3)

Course Description

This course continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, metabolism, fluid/PH dynamics, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.

Course Competencies and Student Learning Outcomes

 The Endocrine System


Order


Description

1

Discuss the functions of the endocrine system in maintaining homeostasis.

2

Contrast the endocrine and nervous systems.

3

Explain the general mechanisms by which hormones work.

4

 

Differentiate the major chemical classes of hormones.

5

 

Describe how each class is transported.

6

 

Compare and contrast the receptors of each class; and the mechanism of response each class elicits.

7

Discuss the control of endocrine organs.

8

Describe the role of the hypothalamus in endocrine control.

9

Describe the location, hormones, and functions of the following endocrine glands: pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, pancreas, ovaries, testes, pineal, and thymus.

10

Describe endocrine disorders of hypo- and hypersecretion.

11

 

Contrast endocrine hormones with paracrine and autocrine.

12

 

Discuss the roles of the major stress-response hormones.

13

 

Differentiate between short-term and long-term stress and describe the larger health effects of each.

The Cardiovascular System


Order


Description

1

Describe the anatomy of the heart and heart wall.

2

Describe the flow of blood through the heart including the pulmonary and systemic circuits.

3

Explain the structural and functional features of the conduction system of the heart and EKG tracings.

4

 

List the phases of the cardiac muscle action potential and explain the ion movements that occur in each phase.

5

 

Contrast the way action potentials are generated in cardiac pacemaker cells, in cardiac contractile cells and in skeletal muscle cells.

6

 

Compare and contrast cardiac muscle contraction and skeletal muscle contraction.

7

 

Explain the significance of the plateau phase in the action potential of a cardiac contractile cell.

8

 

Compare and contrast the role of nerves in the depolarization of cardiac pacemaker cells, ventricular contractile cells, and skeletal muscle cells.

9

Describe the principal events of the cardiac cycle.

10

Contrast the sounds of the heart and their clinical significance.

11

Calculate cardiac output and discuss factors that affect it.

12

 

Given the heart rate, calculate the length of one cardiac cycle.

13

List the risk factors involved in heart disease.

14

Contrast the structure and function of the various types of blood vessels.

15

Explain how the venous blood is returned to the heart.

16

Explain blood pressure and pulse.

17

Discuss the factors that affect blood pressure.

18

Define systolic and diastolic blood pressure and interpret a graph of aortic pressure versus time during the cardiac cycle.

19

 

List the local, hormonal and neuronal factors that affect peripheral resistance and explain the importance of each.

20

 

Interpret relevant graphs to explain the relationships between vessel diameter, cross-sectional area, blood pressure, and blood velocity.

21

 

Using a graph of pressures within the systemic circuit, interpret the pressure changes that occur in the arteries, capillaries, and veins.

22

 

During the baroreceptor reflex, explain how cardiac output and peripheral resistance are regulated to maintain adequate blood pressure on a moment-to-moment basis.

23

 

Explain the role of the sympathetic nervous system in regulation of blood pressure and volume.

24

Discuss the mechanism of capillary exchange.

25

 

Describe how net filtration pressure across the capillary wall determines movement of fluid across the capillary wall.

26

 

Relate net filtration pressure to potential edema and the need for a functional lymphatic system.

27

Describe blood flow through systemic and pulmonary circuits.  Identify the principal arteries and veins of the systemic, pulmonary, and hepatic portal circulations.

28

 

Explain how autoregulation controls blood flow to individual tissues.

29

 

Explain the role of the precapillary sphincter in autoregulation.

30

 

List chemicals that cause vasodilation and vasoconstriction; explaining when they are active.

31

Describe unique aspects of fetal circulation.

32

 

Describe the role of the placenta and umbilical blood vessels in fetal circulation.

33

 

Identify the ductus venosus, foramen ovale, and ductus arteriosus and explain their roles in fetal circulation.

34

 

Trace the pathway of blood flow from the placenta through the fetal heart and body and back to the placenta.

35

 

For each umbilical vessel and the major fetal blood vessels, state whether each vessel carries oxygen-rich, oxygen-poor or mixed blood, and explain why the different oxygen levels occur in these vessels.

36

 

Compare and contrast prenatal and postnatal circulatory pathways.

37

Explain the effects of exercise on the cardiovascular system.

38

 

Explain the role of hormones in regulation of blood pressure, including the mechanism by which specific hormones affect preload, heart rate, inotropic state or vascular resistance.

39

Describe significant cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure.

The Blood and Lymphatic System


Order


Description

1

Discuss the function and physical characteristics of blood, lymph, and interstitial fluid, and the lymphatic system.

2

List the components of plasma and their functions.

3

List the characteristics and functions of formed elements.

4

 

Describe the location of hematopoiesis and the significance of the pluripotent stem cell (hemocytoblast).

5

 

Explain the basic process of erythropoiesis, the significance of the reticulocyte, and regulation through erythropoietin.

6

 

Discuss the difference in leukopoiesis of granulocytes and agranulocytes.

7

 

Discuss the role of the megakaryocyte in the formation of platelets.

8

 

State the function of red blood cells.

9

 

Discuss the structure and function of hemoglobin, as well as its breakdown products.

10

List the lymphoid cells including lymphocytes (T and B cells), plasma cells, macrophages and reticular cells and describe the basic function of each.

11

Discuss lymphoid organs including lymph nodes, bone marrow, spleen, thymus, tonsils and nodule aggregates.

12

Identify the stages involved in hemostasis.

13

 

Differentiate between the intrinsic and extrinsic clotting mechanisms.

14

 

Explain the role of calcium ions and vitamin K in blood clotting.

15

 

Discuss the process of fibrinolysis, including the roles of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator and plasmin.

16

 

Explain the mechanisms of action and give examples of procoagulants, anticoagulants and fibrinolytic drugs.

17

Explain the ABO and Rh blood grouping systems.

18

Discuss causes of anemia.

19

Describe selected blood disorders and tests.

The Immune System


Order


Description

1

Discuss the basic properties of immunity.

2

Compare and contrast innate and adaptive immunity.

3

 

Define diapedesis, chemotaxis, opsonization, and membrane attack complex and explain their importance for innate defenses.

4

 

Explain how complement and interferon function.

5

 

Describe the mechanisms of inflammation initiation.

6

 

List and explain the cause of the four cardinal signs of inflammation.

7

 

Describe the mechanism of fever and the role of pyrogens. Explain why fever can be beneficial.

Distinguish among complete antigens, haptens, antigenic determinants and self-antigens.

8

 

Describe where class I and class II MHC and MHC proteins are found.

9

 

Explain the function of class I and class II MHC in adaptive immunity.

10

 

Explain the role of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and provide examples of cells that function as APCs

11

 

Define immunocompetence and self tolerance and distinguish between naive and activated immune cells.

12

 

Compare & contrast the sites where the cells originate and achieve their immunocompetence, and the primary location of the immunocompetent cells in the body.

13

 

Describe antibody structure.

14

 

Describe mechanisms of antibody action and correlate mechanisms with effector functions.

15

 

List the five classes of antibodies and discuss structural and functional features that distinguish each class.

16

Explain the process of cellular immunity and the role to T-cells.

17

Explain the process of humoral immunity and the role of B-cells and antibodies.

18

Discuss the difference between primary and secondary responses.

19

 

Interpret a graph of the primary and secondary immune response, in terms of the relative concentrations of different classes of antibodies produced over time.

20

Describe types of active and passive immunity.

21

Describe selected immune disorders.

The Respiratory System


Order


Description

1

Identify the organs of the respiratory system and describe their functions.

2

Contrast internal and external respiration and explain the role of the alveolar-capillary membrane.

3

Describe the events involved in pulmonary ventilation and discuss the significance of pleura.

4

 

Define, identify, and determine values for the respiratory volumes (IRV, TV, ERV, and RV) and the respiratory capacities (IC, FRC, VC, and TLC).

5

 

Describe oxygen and carbon dioxide concentration gradients and net gas movements.

6

 

Analyze how oxygen and carbon dioxide movements are affected by changes in partial pressure gradients (e.g., at high altitude), surface area, diffusion distance, and solubility and molecular weight of the gases.

7

 

Describe the mechanisms of ventilation-perfusion coupling and predict the effect that reduced alveolar ventilation has on pulmonary blood flow and the effect that reduced pulmonary blood flow has on bronchiole diameter and alveolar ventilation.

8

Explain the mechanism of oxygen and carbon dioxide transport in the blood.

9

 

Predict how changing the partial pressure of carbon dioxide will affect the pH and the concentration bicarbonate ions in the plasma.

10

 

Predict how changing the pH or the concentration of bicarbonate ions will affect the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the plasma.

11

 

Explain how each of the following relates to carbon dioxide transport:  carbonic anhydrase, hydrogen ions binding to hemoglobin and plasma proteins, the chloride ion shift, and the oxygen-hemoglobin saturation level.

12

Describe the various factors that control the rate of respiration.

13

 

With respect to the oxygen-hemoglobin saturation curve: Interpret the curve at low and high partial pressures of oxygen.

List factors that shift the curve down and to the right, and explain how this results in increased oxygen delivery to the tissues.

14

 

List factors that shift the curve up and to the left, and explain how this facilitates oxygen binding to hemoglobin in the lungs.

15

 

Explain why it is possible to hold one’s breath longer after hyperventilating than after eupnea.

16

 

Describe the role of the respiratory system in regulation of blood pH and predict how hypo- and hyperventilation will affect blood pH.

17

Define selected disorders of the respiratory system.

The Digestive System and Metabolism


Order


Description

1

Identify the organs of the gastrointestinal tract and the accessory organs of digestion and their functions in digestion.

2

Identify the general histological layers of the digestive organs and explain how the layers are modified to accommodate the function of each organ.

3

 

Identify the structure of a gastric gland including the location of the chief (zymogenic) cells, parietal (oxynic) cells, enteroendocrine cells, and mucous cells, and discuss the functions of these different cell types.

4

 

Identify Brunner’s glands (duodenal glands) in the duodenum and Crypts of Leiberkuhn (intestinal glands) in all portions of the small intestine, and discuss the function of these glands.

5

 

Identify the individual lobes of the liver

6

 

Identify the histological components of a liver lobule (including hepatocytes, hepatic sinusoids, Kupffer cells, bile canaliculi, central vein, and the components of a hepatic triad) and discuss the function of each.

7

 

Identify the hepatic duct, cystic duct, gallbladder, common bile duct, sphincter of the hepatopancreatic ampulla (ampulla of Vater and sphincter of Oddi) and discuss the roles of those structures in the flow of bile.

8

 

Identify the pancreatic acini and discuss their functions.

9

 

Identify the pancreatic islets and discuss their functions.

10

 

Identify the pancreatic duct and the hepatopancreatic sphincter and discuss their roles in the flow of pancreatic enzymes.

11

Describe the mechanical movements of the GI tract.

12

 

Explain how volume, chemical composition, and osmolarity of the chyme affect motility in the stomach and in the duodenum.

13

 

List the components of both a short reflex and a long reflex in the digestive system.

14

 

Explain the effect of the cephalic phase of regulation on the mucous glands.

15

 

Explain the effect of the cephalic phase, gastric phase, and intestinal phase on the functions of the stomach and give examples for each phase.

16

 

Explain the effect of the cephalic phase, gastric phase, and intestinal phase on the functions of the small intestine and give examples for each phase.

17

 

With respect to the following hormones or paracrine agents – gastrin, cholecystokinin,secretin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, histamine, somatostatin, and motilin: State the organ or structure that produces each hormone or agent. State the target organ for each hormone or agent. Describe the action of each hormone or agent.

18

Identify the major digestive secretions and their functions.

19

List the enzymes involved in the breakdown of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

20

Describe the process of absorption of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins.

21

Define the processes involved in the formation of feces and defecation.

22

 

Describe the defecation reflex and the function of the internal and external anal sphincters.

23

 

Discuss the conscious control of the defecation reflex. Discuss the specific role of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system in the reflex

Explain the Valsalva maneuver and the effects it has on the process of defecation and on the cardiovascular system.

24

Describe common disorders of the digestive system.

25

 

Define nutrient, essential nutrient and non-essential nutrient.

26

 

Classify vitamins as either fat-soluble or water-soluble and discuss the major uses of each vitamin in the body.

27

 

List the important dietary minerals and describe the major uses of each mineral in the body.

28

 

Describe the components of a balanced diet   including the concept of recommended daily amounts.

29

 

Discuss appetite control, including its regulation by hormones.

30

Discuss carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism.

31

 

Provide examples of anabolic and catabolic  reactions.

32

 

Compare and contrast the roles of enzymes and coenzymes in metabolism.

33

 

Explain the roles of coenzyme A, NAD, and FAD in metabolism.

34

 

State the overall reaction for glucose catabolism.

35

 

Describe the processes of glycolysis, formation of acetyl CoA, the Kreb’s (TCA) cycle, and the electron transport chain, including the substrates and products of each, their locations within the cell and the energy yield of each process.

36

 

Describe the process of chemiosmosis and its role in ATP production.

37

 

Describe the anaerobic process for generating ATP, including conditions under which it occurs and its products and their functions.

38

 

Describe the processes of glycogenesis, glycogenolysis, and gluconeogenesis, including the substrates and products of each.

39

 

Describe the role of hormones (such as cortisol, growth hormone, thyroid hormone, insulin, glucagon and norepinephrine) in regulation of carbohydrate catabolism and anabolism.

40

 

Predict the metabolic conditions that would favor each of the following processes: glycogenesis, glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis.

41

Discuss metabolic rate and the role of the liver in metabolism.

42

 

Describe the process of deamination and its importance in gluconeogenesis and the interconversion of nutrients.

43

 

Describe the process of transamination in the interconversion of nutrients.

44

 

Describe the effect of protein metabolism on ammonia and urea production.

45

 

Name essential fatty acids and their functions.

46

 

Summarize the overall process of the beta oxidation of fatty acids and explain how it relates to ketogenesis & ketoacidosis.

47

 

Describe the interconversion pathways of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

48

Compare and contrast the processes that occur in the absorptive and post-absorptive states.

49

 

Explain the role of cortisol, human growth hormone, thyroid hormone, insulin and glucagon in the absorptive and post-absorptive states. 

50

 

Explain the significance of glucose-sparing for neural tissue in the post-absorptive state.

51

 

Discuss the importance of energy (caloric) balance in maintaining healthy body weight.

52

 

Define metabolic rate and basal metabolic rate.

53

 

Describe factors that affect metabolic rate.

54

 

Explain the importance of thermoregulation in the body. 

55

 

Explain the role of metabolism as it relates to other body systems to maintain homeostasis.

56

 

Predict the types of problems that would occur in the body metabolic processes could not maintain homeostasis.

The Urinary System


Order


Description

1

Identify the external and internal gross anatomical features of the kidneys.

2

 

Describe the structure of the filtration membrane.

3

Discuss the formation of urine explaining the microscopic anatomy of the nephron and its basic functions of filtration, reabsorption, and secretion.

4

 

Explain the anatomical features that create high glomerular capillary blood pressure and explain why this blood pressure is significant for urine formation.

5

 

Describe the hydrostatic and colloid osmotic forces that favor and oppose filtration.

6

 

Describe glomerular filtration rate (GFR), state the average value of GFR, and explain how clearance rate can be used to measure GFR.

7

 

Predict specific factors that will increase or decrease GFR.

8

 

List specific transport mechanisms occurring in different parts of the nephron, including active transport, osmosis, facilitated diffusion, passive electrochemical gradients, receptor-mediated endocytosis, and transcytosis.

9

 

List the different membrane proteins of the nephron, including aquaporins, channels, transporters, and ATPase pumps.

10

 

Compare and contrast passive and active tubular reabsorption.

11

 

Describe how and where water, organic compounds, and ions are reabsorbed in the nephron.

12

 

Explain the role of the loop of Henle, the vasa recta, and the countercurrent multiplication mechanism in the concentration of urine.

13

 

State the percent of filtrate that is normally reabsorbed and explain why the process of reabsorption is so important. 

14

 

Describe the physiological processes involved in eliminating drugs, wastes and excess ions.

15

 

Compare and contrast blood plasma, glomerular filtrate, and urine and then relate their differences to function of the nephron.

16

Discuss the role of the kidney in maintaining blood pressure.

17

 

Describe the function of the juxtaglomerular apparatus.

18

 

Describe how each of the following functions in the extrinsic control of GFR: renin-angiotensin mechanism, natriuretic peptides, and sympathetic adrenergic activity.

19

Explain the role of key hormones on the kidney and their role in water and electrolyte balance.

20

Discuss the role of the kidney in homeostasis of pH.

21

 

Explain the mechanisms by which the kidneys secrete hydrogen ions, and how this process affects blood pH.

22

 

Explain the mechanisms by which the kidneys retain bicarbonate ions, and how this process affects blood pH.

23

Discuss the components of urine.

24

 

Predict specific factors involved in creating dilute versus concentrated urine.

25

 

Explain the mechanism of action of diuretics.

26

 

Describe the role of kidney in vitamin D activation.

27

 

Describe the role of kidney in regulating erythropoiesis.

28

 

Describe voluntary and involuntary neural control of micturition.

29

Discuss the structure and physiology of the ureters, urinary bladder, and urethra.

30

Describe disorders of the urinary system.

Fluid/Electrolyte/pH Balance


Order


Description

1

List and describe the routes of water entry into the body and state representative volumes for each.

2

 

List and describe the routes of water loss from the body and state representative volumes for each.

3

Describe the mechanisms used to regulate water intake.

4

 

Describe the mechanisms used to regulate water output.

5

 

Describe the fluid compartments (including the subdivisions of the extracellular fluid) and state the relative volumes of each.

6

 

Define electrolyte.

7

 

Compare and contrast the relative concentrations of major electrolytes in intracellular and extracellular fluids

8

 

Describe the function(s) of each abundant electrolyte found in body fluids, including sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphate and calcium. 

9

 

Describe hormonal regulation of electrolyte levels in the plasma, including sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphate and calcium. 

10

 

Explain the role of electrolytes and non-electrolytes in the determination of osmotic pressure.

11

 

Compare and contrast the roles that osmosis and capillary filtration play in the movement of fluids between compartments.

12

 

Explain how dehydration and overhydration (water intoxication) develop and how fluids shift between the three major body compartments during each.

13

 

Define acid, base, pH and buffer.

14

 

State the normal pH range for arterial blood.

15

 

With respect to the bicarbonate buffer system, the

phosphate buffer system and the protein buffer system:

16

 

State the chemical equation for each buffer system.

17

 

Explain the role of each buffer system in regulation of blood, interstitial fluid, and intracellular pH, including how each system responds to increases or decreases in pH.

18

 

Explain the role of hemoglobin in pH buffering.

19

 

State the normal ranges for PCO2 and HCO3 in arterial blood and summarize their relationship to blood pH.

20

 

Discuss the concept of compensation to correct respiratory and metabolic acidosis and alkalosis.  

21

 

Given appropriate arterial blood gas values, determine whether a patient has normal blood pH or is in respiratory acidosis or alkalosis or is in metabolic acidosis or alkalosis, and whether the acidosis/alkalosis is partially or fully compensated or uncompensated.

22

 

Provide specific examples to demonstrate how the cardiovascular, endocrine, and urinary systems respond to maintain homeostasis of fluid volume and pH in the body.

23

 

Predict factors or situations that would lead to a disruption of homeostasis by affecting the volume or composition of body fluids.

24

 

Predict factors or situations that would lead to a disruption of homeostasis by causing respiratory acidosis, respiratory alkalosis, metabolic acidosis, or metabolic alkalosis. 

25

 

Predict the types of problems that would occur in the body if the volume and composition of body fluids were not maintained within normal homeostatic ranges.

26

 

Predict the types of problems that would occur in the body if body fluid pH were not maintained within the normal homeostatic range

The Reproductive System


Order


Description

1

Explain the structure and functions of the male reproductive organs and the pathway of sperm.

2

Discuss the processes of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis in the male.

3

Describe the normal composition of semen and the role of the accessory sex glands in production of semen.

4

Discuss the role of hormones in the male reproductive system.

5

Explain the structure and functions of the female reproductive organs and the pathway of the egg /zygote.

6

Discuss the process of oogenesis.

7

Discuss the principal events of the menstrual and ovarian cycles and explain all hormones involved.

8

 

Analyze graphs depicting the typical female monthly sexual cycle and correlate ovarian activity, hormonal changes, and uterine events.

9

 

Define menopause, describe the physiological changes associated with menopause, and explain the fertility changes that precede menopause.

10

Discuss the physiology of sexual intercourse.

11

Discuss examples of male and female reproductive diseases.

12

 

Describe conception, including sperm capacitation, acrosomal reaction, sperm penetration, cortical reaction, and fusion of pronuclei.

13

 

Define fertilization.

14

 

Describe the major events of embryonic and fetal development.

15

 

Describe the formation and function of the placenta and extraembryonic membranes.

16

 

Describe the hormonal changes during pregnancy and the effect of these hormones.

17

 

Describe the functional changes in the maternal reproductive, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems during pregnancy. 

18

 

Explain the hormonal events that initiate and regulate labor.

19

 

Describe the three stages of labor.

20

 

Describe the structure and the function of the mammary glands.

21

 

Describe the hormonal regulation of lactation.

Required Textbooks and Materials

Students enrolled in this course are obligated to have the following:

Human Anatomy and Physiology, 10th ed. (2013), Elaine Marieb & Katja Hoehn, Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, ISBN - 978-0-321-92704-0

Grading Policy and Criteria

Course addendum will provide details concerning class grading and assignment submission policies that will be used for evaluation.

Grading Scale

The grading scale is detailed in the Catalog and Student Handbook and listed below for reference. All faculty members follow this scale when assigning grades to reflect a given student's performance in the classroom.

Grade Numerical Equivalent Grade Point
A/A* 90-100 4
B/B* 80-89 3
C/C* 70-79 2
D/D* 60-69 1
F/F* 0-59 0

Effective Summer Quarter 2006, Athens Technical College replaced the S/U grading system used for learning support classes with an A*-F* grading system. The registrar uses an asterisk (A*, B*, C*, D*, F*, W*, WF*, WP*) to designate learning support course grades on transcripts and grade reports because these grades are not components of the term grade point average.

Academic Support Center

The Academic Support Centers of Athens Technical College (ATC) provide free tutoring for enrolled students. Both instructors and peer tutors provide tutoring in almost all subjects offered by the college. Information about the Center is accessible via the ATC website at http://www.athenstech.edu/StudentDevelopmentServices/AcademicSupportCenter. To find out the specific services available on the Athens, Greene, and Walton Campuses, please call (706) 583-2839. To contact the Academic Support Center on the Elbert County Campus, please call (706) 213-2129.

Attendance

Regular class attendance is important and expected. The college considers both tardiness and early departure from class as forms of absenteeism. Students absent from class for any reason are still responsible for all work missed. Instructors have the right to determine whether work missed can be made up and have the liberty to set reasonable expectations for attendance based on frequency of class meetings and on the instructional delivery method, subject, type, and level of the class. Class attendance policies will be clearly stated for students by their respective instructors on separate documents (course outlines/schedules) or appendices to the master syllabus.

Course Withdrawal

Students may withdraw from courses without academic penalty during the first 61% of an academic term. By withdrawing before the 61% withdrawal deadline, students automatically receive grades of W, which do not affect semester or cumulative grade point averages. Grades of W do affect students' satisfactory academic progress for financial aid purposes. After the 61% withdrawal deadline, students may withdraw from classes up to the final withdrawal deadline as indicated on the Academic Calendar. After the 61% withdrawal deadline, instructors must assign grades of WP-Withdrawal Passing or WF-Withdrawal Failing. Grades of WP and WF affect students' satisfactory academic progress for financial aid purposes. Grades of WF also affect students' academic standing. Instructors calculate withdrawing students' grades at the point they submit withdrawal forms for instructors to sign, not at the point when students stop attending class. W, WP, and WF grades appear on academic transcripts.

Students who stop attending classes without formally withdrawing from courses risk earning final grades of F, which appear on academic transcripts.

Refer to the Withdrawing from Classes section of this catalog for further information about withdrawing from classes.

Course Technology

Athens Technical College instructional technology is based on a Microsoft Windows® platform unless otherwise specified. Software and coursework may not function properly with other operating systems and mobile technology.

Course addendum will provide details concerning the use of technology in the course. Course schedule types include web-enhanced – taught face-to-face; online – taught online using the internet, may require proctored exam; hybrid – class time is split between face-to-face and online; video conference – taught at two or more campus locations simultaneously with instructor located at one of the classroom locations. More details are available on the Athens Technical College website. http://www.athenstech.edu/eLearning/CourseList.cfm

Continuation of Instruction

In the event of severe weather or other emergency, students will be expected to continue participating in learning activities via Blackboard, Athens Technical College email, or other modality. Instructors will provide a plan for the continuation of instruction.

Work Ethics

To fulfill the responsibility to teach essential workplace ethics, the college provides students instruction in, and evaluates students on, the following ten work ethics traits: attendance, character, teamwork, appearance, attitude, productivity, organizational skills, communication, cooperation, and respect. To best equip students for successful workplace experiences in their chosen profession, instruction and evaluation takes place in the context of their program of study.

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty is expected at all times. Any student found to have engaged in academic misconduct such as cheating, plagiarism, or collusion is subject to disciplinary sanctions as outlined in the Student Code of Conduct detailed in the ATC Catalog and Student Handbook . See the following link for the complete Academic Honesty policy. http://athenstech.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2015-2016/Catalog/Academic-Honesty-Policy
Students are also advised to complete the tutorial on Academic Honesty available here: http://www.athenstech.edu/policy/academichonesty/index.html

Americans with Disabilities Act

It is our goal at Athens Technical College to provide equal access to education for all students. Any student with a documented disability is eligible to receive reasonable academic adjustments and auxiliary aids in the classroom and/or for testing at Athens Technical College, as long as appropriate documentation of the disability has been submitted to the Disability Services Office in a timely manner. Students can access the application packet on our website. http://www.athenstech.edu/CurrentStudents/orientation/files/disability_services_application.pdf

Cell Phones and Electronic Devices

Cell phone use in the classroom for non-instructional purposes, with the exception of receiving emergency notifications, is prohibited.

Food Drinks in Classroom

Classrooms and computer labs: food and beverages (other than water) are not allowed.
Science labs: Food and beverages (of any kind) are not allowed in the laboratory. Eating or drinking in the laboratory represents a significant breach of accepted safety practices and are not allowed.

Communication with ATC Faculty and Staff

Students, faculty, and staff must use Athens Technical College email and Blackboard accounts for all college-related communications. Students are obligated to check their email and Blackboard accounts on a regular basis, preferably daily.

Warranty of Graduates

The Technical College System of Georgia warranties every graduate of technical programs in which students may earn technical certificates of credit, diplomas, or associate degrees. The warranty guarantees that graduates demonstrate the knowledge and skills and can perform each competency as identified in the industry-validated standards established for every program of study. If one of our graduates educated under a standard program or his/her employer finds that the graduate is deficient in one or more competencies as defined in the course/program standards, Athens Technical College will retrain the employee at no instructional cost to the employee or the employer. This guarantee is in effect for two years after graduation.

TEACH Act

According to the TEACH Act of 2002, Athens Technical College is obligated to advise you that instructional material included in this course may be subject to copyright protection. As such, you must not share, duplicate, transmit, or store the material of this course beyond the purpose and time frame explicitly stated in the syllabus of your course. If you are not certain whether a particular piece of material is covered by copyright protection, you should contact your instructor and obtain his/her written clarification. Failing to observe copyright protection is a violation of law.

Library Services

The ATC library staff on each campus are here for you! The Library offers print and online resources including articles, books, and videos. Librarians want to help you succeed, so contact them when beginning your research to find the best information in a timely manner and how to cite it, too. Assistance is available in person or by phone, email, text, and chat. Other services include borrowing titles from other libraries, issuing applications for a UGA borrowing card, printing & copying, and providing group study rooms (Athens). For more information visit the Library site: http://library.athenstech.edu.